Sunday, 21 October, 2018

Yanny vs Laurel: the debate rages on

Yanny or Laurel? A simple looped soundbite with just two syllables has ignited an internet meltdown Yanny or Laurel? A simple looped soundbite with just two syllables has ignited an internet meltdown More
Adrian Cunningham | 17 May, 2018, 03:28

If you mess with the frequencies in a recording, you can change what people hear - it's similar to the way that our eyes can be tricked by an optical illusion.

Several researchers agreed that the audio recording is just too ambiguous.

An audio snippet with just two syllables has ignited an internet meltdown, dividing social media users into staunchly opposed camps: do you hear "Yanny" or "Laurel?".

Watch as Ghastly and Boombox Cartel chime in with their thoughts on the Yanny or Laurel fiasco. First posted on Reddit, the polarizing audio clip spread to Twitter. "So yanny is more of a high-pitched sound, and laurel is more of a low frequency sound", said Dr. Voellinger, an audiology specialist at Deaconess Gateway. Like the Internet, passersby seemed conflicted, confused and couldn't come up with a unifying answer. "It's not a very high quality".

That aside, Story ran an acoustic analysis on the viral recording of the computerized voice. It is Laurel and not Yanny alright.

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He played it for his peers, who disagreed over whether the syllables formed "Yanny" or "Laurel". To his ear, this was definitely a recording of the word "laurel".

OK, so what does that all mean? They also say people may hear slightly different frequencies or pitches which would explain why two people hear two different words playing on the same device.

If you heard "Laurel", you are the victor and have earned bragging rights for this round of internet debate. Story said with Laurel and Yanny, it's not surprising that people could hear either.

CNN's Brian Ries contributed to the report.