Monday, 18 June, 2018

A look at the events leading up to Canada vs. USA battle

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau takes part in a meeting at the G7 Leaders Summit in La Malbaie Que. on Friday Trump considering separate NAFTA deals? | Apparel Industry News
Deanna Wagner | 14 June, 2018, 05:32

Canada's Prime Minister Justin Trudeau (R) meets with U.S. President Donald Trump during the G7 Summit in the Charlevoix town of La Malbaie, Quebec, Canada, June 8, 2018.

Trudeau reiterated his objections to Trump's imposition of tariffs on steel and aluminum from Canada, Mexico and the European Union and his own plans to introduce retaliatory measures targeting USA products.

During a news conference, Trudeau had reasserted his opposition to U.S. tariffs on steel and aluminium, and vowed to press ahead with retaliatory moves on July 1.

He really kind of stabbed us in the back.

It came in response to what he claimed were "false statements" by Canadian premier Justin Trudeau. -Canada border. Trudeau told reporters that imposing retaliatory measures "is not something I relish doing" but that he wouldn't hesitate to do so because "I will always protect Canadian workers and Canadian interests".

The G7's other attendees fear a looming trade war over the Trump administration's move to impose steep tariffs on steel and aluminum imports from the European Union, Canada and Mexico.

Trump's attacks have Canadian businesses that use aluminum and steel very anxious, said Ontario Conservative MP John Brassard, who added that there is real concern that there will be serious job implications in very short order.

President Donald Trump said Saturday that North Korean leader Kim Jong Un has a "one-time shot" to show he's serious about a nuclear disarmament deal.

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The Taxi and Limousine Commission is investigating. "It was a good lesson to show it can happen to you anywhere". The couple said they were deeply shaken by the incident, which occurred during Pride Month. "We were in shock".

European officials said Trump had tried to water down the language in the draft final summit communique on the World Trade Organization and rules-based trade.

Members of Parliament gave unanimous consent for a motion backing Canadian steel and aluminium, hit by U.S. tariffs, as well as the supply management system that supports key agriculture sectors, and gave a standing ovation for the government response to the Trump administration's verbal attacks on Trudeau.

Lucey reported from Singapore and Gillies from Quebec City.

Members of Trump's inner circle continued the attacks, with both chief economic adviser Larry Kudlow - who said that Trudeau had "stabbed us in the back" - and Peter Navarro, Trump's trade adviser, directing a series of stinging comments at the Canadian leader.

"I think the pushback by Congress is going to come up incredibly short", Chris Barron, a pro-Trump Republican strategist, said of Republican efforts to rein in Trump.

European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker is set to debrief Commissioners about the G7 and underline the commitment made by the EU in the communiqué to "continue to stand up for an global rules-based multilateral system". Trump wrote on Twitter. Trudeau pulled a "sophomoric political stunt for domestic consumption" that amounted to "a betrayal", said Kudlow, who appeared on CNN's "State of the Union" and CBS' "Face the Nation". "That Canada could be considered a national security threat to the United States is inconceivable".

"I know my colleagues are hearing from numerous businesses and manufacturers across the country very similar stories, that this trade dispute is probably two weeks away from affecting Canadians in a very real way", he said.

Bashing the leader of one of America's venerable allies, the White House escalated its trade tirade and leveled more withering and unprecedented criticism Sunday against Canada's prime minister, branding Justin Trudeau a back-stabber unworthy of President Trump's time.