Monday, 10 December, 2018

British PM avoids Brexit defeat in knife-edge parliament vote

Brexit news- jonathan isaby and dominic grieve SKY NEWS • BBCBrexit news Jonathan Isaby blasted backbenchers threatening to vote against the Brexit Bill
Deanna Wagner | 13 June, 2018, 11:20

The Lib Dems, who identify strongly as an anti-Brexit party to the point of pushing for a second referendum and running by-elections in Remain-friendly seats on that platform, opposed the Government.

Conservative lawmaker Phillip Lee resigned as a justice minister Tuesday so he could speak out against the policy on Brexit.

Sarah Wollaston warned that any government amendment added to the bill when it returns to the House of Lords "must closely reflect Dominic Grieve's amendment".

She has previously spoken of the threats she faced for challenging the government, and revealed that one colleague would not be voting as they wished this week for fear of reprisals.

Crucially, ministers have conceded that if MPs vote down the Withdrawal Agreement with Brussels, that will not result in the United Kingdom crashing out of the European Union with no deal - a scenario that few MPs would countenance because of the significant economic damage it would entail.

The most contentious was the bid to give Parliament the power to tell the government what to do if the Brexit deal was voted down or no agreement was reached.

That came after the embarrassing spectacle of government minister Robert Buckland effectively negotiating with Grieve, through a series of interventions in the rebel backbencher's speech, in what Anna Soubry called "a peculiar sort of horse-trading" - and then literally negotiating with him, in whispered exchanges, as the debate went on around them.

Mr. Lee resigned from the Ministry of Justice to back the amendment, saying parliament should be able to direct the government to change course.

They also voted to disagree with Lords amendment 37, which was part of an attempt to remove the exit day from the Bill and allow the Commons to rethink its approach.

MPs, ministers and officials all agreed Tuesday that a soft Brexit or even the prospect of no Brexit is greatly increased - so too the prospect of a snap early election before the end of the year.

"I can not support the government's decision to oppose this amendment because doing so breaches such fundamental principles of human rights and parliamentary sovereignty", he said.

Storm chances and heat to finish out the weekend
In fact our in house computer model doesn't even have rain at all tonight while other computer models keep at least a chance. Temps today will be well below average along the coast this afternoon with the numbers holding in the low to mid 60s.

May is resisting changes approved by the House of Lords that would soften Britain's exit from the European Union, because she says they will weaken the government's negotiating position.

She has already agreed to give MPs a vote on the final Brexit deal, but says it will be a yes or no decision - meaning that rejecting it could see Britain crash out of the EU.

"Anything that undermines the government at home will make negotiations with the European Union more hard", May told a meeting of her cabinet.

"We will be talking to the government immediately after this in order to find a common way forward".

"The Government's amendment today provides for a meaningful vote".

British Prime Minister Theresa May faces another day of Brexit compromise at Westminster.

Fellow MP Antoinette Sandbach rejected suggestions by leading Brexiteers in her party that this would tie the prime minister's hands in negotiations.

The E.U. (Withdrawal) Bill is the draft law that would set the legal framework for Brexit and Ms.

LONDON - Theresa May has narrowly avoided a humiliating parliamentary defeat on Brexit after making a major concession to Conservative rebels which could hand MPs an effective veto on her Brexit deal.

"We will wait and see the details of this concession and will hold ministers to account to ensure it lives up to the promises they have made to parliament".