Tuesday, 14 August, 2018

Kentucky Fried What? KFC will test a vegetarian alternative in UK

Would the Colonel be keen on a vegetarian version of his famous fried chicken? Not likely John Hawkins Would the Colonel be keen on a vegetarian version of his famous fried chicken? Not likely
Ginger Lawrence | 10 June, 2018, 04:33

In deciding to experiment with a vegetarian chicken substitute, KFC also seems to be responding to a growing demand for meat-replacement products such as tofu and soy-based burgers and sausages.

In due course, PHE is aiming for United Kingdom adults to consume as little as 400 calories at breakfast and 600 calories for lunch and dinner.

KFC U.K. reportedly plans to add vegetarian fried chicken to its menu, as many consumers have switched to healthy lifestyle.

What that alternative is remains a mystery, with the chain saying the recipe is in its "very early stages".

KFC UK told Foodbeast that it is still working on the recipe and plans to test it with customers this year and launch the product next year.

KFC U.K. told the Daily Mirror that it intends to cut the chain's per serving calorie counts by 20 percent by 2025, a year behind what the country's health service is proposing.

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KFC did not say if something similar will appear on its menus in the U.S.

KFC has no immediate plans to introduce vegetarian fried chicken to its US restaurants. In April, White Castle introduced a plant-based version of its cheese slider in its stores in New York, New Jersey and Chicago.

Now vegetarians who desperately miss that delicious blend will be able to reintroduce it to their lives, with the happy news that KFC are trialling a fake chicken option - which will be coated in the aforementioned spices.

American consumers spent $698.6 million (U.S.) on meat substitutes previous year, up 25.6 percent from $556.3 million in 2012, according to statistics published by the research firm Euromonitor International.

In April, White Castle introduced a plant-based burger, the product of an alliance with a startup called Impossible Foods, at 140 locations in New York, New Jersey and IL. "We're talking about millions of people dramatically changing their diets".