Tuesday, 13 November, 2018

Trump Adviser Says Two Supreme Court Candidates Are Tougher Sell

Yes Another Liberal SCOTUS Meltdown Is Coming...And It Could Be One For The Record Books Trump has decided his Supreme Court nominee as parties prepare for fight
Deanna Wagner | 10 July, 2018, 05:31

Federal appeals court judges L-R: Raymond Kethledge, Brett Kavanaugh, Amy Coney Barrett, and Thomas Hardiman, being considered by President Donald Trump for the U.S. Supreme Court, are seen in this combination photo from files.

They're all younger than 55 and conservative enough to make a first cut.

Leo said, however, that ultimately Trump would succeed at lining up conservative support for anyone he selected.

He has served since 2006 on the influential US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit and was formerly a White House aide under George W Bush.

The US president said Judge Kavanaugh was known for having a "proven commitment to equal justice under the law". She no longer hears cases. As an attorney, Kavanaugh worked for the special counsel investigating former President Bill Clinton, who was eventually impeached, and also worked for the Bush campaign during the 2000 presidential election recount.

Hardiman could also have one important advocate. Kethledge, 51, is a judge for the Cincinnati, Ohio-based 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, while Hardiman, 52, serves on the Philadelphia-based 3rd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals - also appointed by Bush. Last fall, he joined a panel of judges in issuing an order to prevent an undocumented immigrant teenager in US detention from obtaining an abortion. Barrett has said she believes life begins at conception. Barrett has excited social conservatives since she was questioned about her Roman Catholic faith in her nomination hearings previous year, but her brief time on the bench has raised questions.

The president and White House officials involved in the process have fielded calls and messages and have been on the receiving end of public pleas and op-eds for or against specific candidates since Kennedy announced on June 27 that he would retire this summer.

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He said he would ask a rules official about it, and then lined up and hit his shot, a 281-yard iron in the fairway. Open, Phil Mickelson found himself at the center of another highly unusual rules controversy on Sunday.

Two Republican senators, Lisa Murkowski of Alaska and Susan Collins of ME, are pro-abortion and have said they would vote against a candidate who would overturn Roe v. Wade.

"The Democrats are so upset that the Republicans have this opportunity of appointing nominees to the court that they just make every doggone appointment a cause celeb, and that's just ridiculous", he said.

President Donald Trump has already placed one justice on the court, Neil Gorsuch, and says he wants to choose a "great one" to replace retiring Justice Anthony Kennedy. He guided Neil Gorsuch to a seat on the Supreme Court easily in 2017. Gorsuch restored the court's conservative majority.

Kennedy said he was bracing for a tough confirmation battle as Democrats focus on the nominee's views of the high court's Roe v. Wade ruling legalizing abortion.

Democrats have turned their attention to pressuring two Republicans, Collins and Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, to oppose any nominee who threatens Roe v. Wade.

But Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, while not arguing against Kavanaugh on the merits, has spoken to the White House about the volume of material from the judge's career that would need to be pored through, potentially bogging down the confirmation, according to people familiar with the process. But some Democrats accused him of excessive partisanship and it took three years before the Senate eventually voted to confirm him. SCOTUSblog, which covers actions of the Supreme Court, said his opinions have shown an "originalist approach to the Second Amendment right to bear arms", and that he "has not weighed in directly on issues relating to abortion" - two hot-button issues.