Friday, 16 November, 2018

Trump to name his Supreme Court nominee

Today is the day Today is the day. Sean Pavone Getty Images
Deanna Wagner | 11 July, 2018, 01:49

The privilege of naming justices to the U.S. Supreme Court - judges whose decisions could affect the lives of Americans for decades - is one of the most consequential choices a president can make.

Some conservatives have expressed concerns about Kavanaugh - a longtime judge and a former clerk for Kennedy - questioning his commitment to social issues like abortion and noting his time serving under President George W. Bush as evidence he is a more establishment choice.

Kavanaugh, 53, had always been mentioned in Washington chatter as a potential high court choice by a Republican president because of his educational background, intellectual firepower and an unyielding commitment to a legal approach championed by conservative Supreme Court justices such as Clarence Thomas and Samuel A. Alito Jr.

And I believe this person will do a great job, ' the president told reporters before boarding Air Force One to head back to Washington from New Jersey, where he had spent the weekend at his golf club in Bedminster.

The Judicial Crisis Network (JCN), whose leaders pushed Justice Neil Gorsuch over the finish line previous year, are getting their war chests ready. SCOTUSblog, which covers actions of the Supreme Court, said his opinions have shown an "originalist approach to the Second Amendment right to bear arms", and that he "has not weighed in directly on issues relating to abortion" - two hot-button issues. Previous lobbying efforts by McConnell - including a push for fellow Kentuckian 6th Circuit Court of Appeals Judge Amul Thapar, who would have been the court's first Asian-American nominee - have failed. Media reports said that he is not in the list of top three-four judges.

Former Sen. Kelly Ayotte, a New Hampshire Republican, previously served as the Senate sherpa during the confirmation process for Justice Neil Gorsuch, whom Trump nominated in January 2017.

According to the DC Circuit Court website, Kavanaugh volunteers, attends church, and coaches sports in the Washington, DC area, where he was born and raised.

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Reportedly, Louisiana State University law professor Ken Levy suggested that Democratic politicians should sue Republican Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell over the Senate judicial confirmations process to hold them accountable for stalling Obama's nominee in 2016.

White House Principal Press Secretary, Raj Shah, tweeted out the following statement regarding Casey's opposition. He also has taken an expansive view of executive power and has favored limits on investigating the president.

With Democrats determined to vigorously oppose Trump's choice, the Senate confirmation battle is expected to dominate the months leading up to November's midterm elections. Both support a woman's right to have an abortion and will be looking for assurances that the nominee would not overturn the Roe v Wade decision establishing abortion rights.

Barrett, who is 46, has less of a judicial record to review, having just been nominated to the appeals court by Trump past year.

At a White House ceremony announcing the pick, Trump described Kavanaugh as a man of "impeccable credentials" and a "true thought leader among his peers".

Kavanaugh once served as a Supreme Court clerk under Kennedy.

Schumer and other Democratic senators have blasted Trump for having chosen Kavanaugh from a list pre-approved by rightwing outside groups, including the conservative Federalist Society. "We reject judicial activism and policy-making from the bench", he said. He added: "I think they'd be fine justices of the Supreme Court".