Friday, 14 December, 2018

First sounds recorded on surface of Mars by Nasa Insight probe

InSight is designed to study the interior of Mars like never before using seismology instruments to detect quakes and a self-hammering mole to measure heat escape from the planet's crust NASA Recorded the Sounds of Mars (And It's Almost All Creepy Bass)
Sandy Nunez | 08 December, 2018, 22:26

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (Nasa) has been able to capture the sound of winds on Mars for the first time ever through its InSight lander, which landed on the red planet a week ago. "We have a great team, and we're doing incredible things every day at NASA", NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine said. EST (4.40am AEDST). NASA shared two copies of the wind recording, one as it was captured and another adjusted for playback on phones and laptops. The sounds were recorded by an air pressure sensor inside the lander that is part of a weather station, as well as the seismometer on the deck of the spacecraft.

The Jet Propulsion Laboratory released audio clips of the alien wind Friday.

"Humans are multisensor people, and now we have two of our sensors turned on with this mission", with both audio and visual data streaming back to Earth, Don Banfield, the science lead for the air pressure sensor, said during the news conference. They stick out from the lander and are referred to by NASA as looking like "a pair of ears".

Thomas Pike of Imperial College London said the rumbling is "rather different to anything that we've experienced on Earth, and I think it just gives us another way of thinking about how far away we are getting these signals". "The solar panels on the lander's sides respond to pressure fluctuations of the wind". It's like InSight is cupping its ears and hearing the Mars wind beating on it. That's because the seismometer's main goal is to detect marsquakes, or earthquakes on Mars.

Twitter reacts to Matthew Dellavedova-George Hill trade
For the Bucks, this is a salary-clearing situation as they'll save $18 million in cap space for the 2019-20 season. Dekker was in his first season with the Cavs, who got him in an August trade with the Los Angeles Clippers.

We've seen the surface of Mars, through pictures. Were you enthralled? Are you eager for more clearer sounds from the Mars 2020 Rover?

In the video posted on Twitter, NASA said mission engineers will eventually move the seismometer off the lander and onto the ground.

The craft will also have an on board camera that will serve the extremely sci-fi goal of "detect the sound of the instrument's laser as it zaps different materials". The Phoenix Lander did successfully land with a microphone in 2008, but controllers were unable to turn on the microphone because of fears that they would short out the landing system.