Friday, 14 December, 2018

Free public transport being planned in Luxembourg

Luxembourg to become first country to introduce free public transport lailasnews Luxembourg To Make All Public Transport Free Across The Country
Deanna Wagner | 06 December, 2018, 15:53

This is one part of the plans of the re-election coalition government led by Xavier Bettel has been sworn in as Prime Minister for a second term.

On top of the transport pledge, the new government is also considering legalising cannabis, and introducing two new public holidays.

Grand Duchy Prime Minister Xavier Bettel introduced the plan yesterday, December 5, when he took office for his second term, as reported by The Guardian on the same day. Luxembourg city has some of the world's worst traffic congestion, according to the Guardian. Although home to around 110, 000 people, the capital witnesses 400,000 commuters coming to the city to work.

To the benefit of its people, Luxembourg has adopted a progressive attitude in addressing transportation.

Luxembourg is a small European country surrounded by Belgium, France and Germany.

Children and young people under the age of 20 already ride free on public buses, trams and trains in Luxembourg, thanks to a policy change introduced by Bettel's government earlier this year.

Tom Cruise wants you to turn off motion smoothing
On most TVs, motion smoothing controls are under advanced picture settings, and each manufacturer has a different name for it. Tom Cruise feels passionately about motion smoothing - that is, turning it off to enjoy his (and others") movies "properly'.

Currently, fares are capped at €2 ($AUD3.15) for up to two hours of travel, which in the small European nation covers nearly any journey.

Secondary school students are also provided free shuttle services between their places of study and homes.

It's hoped that by 2020, all tickets for public transportation will be abolished, leaving no need for fare collection and policing of ticket purchases and a significant reduction in traffic congestion.

The government, however, has yet to divulge their plans for the first- and second-class compartments on trains.

The Christian Social People's Party (CSV) - which was led for 19 years by European Union chief executive Jean-Claude Juncker - remained the largest party in parliament, but lost seats, as did the LSAP and the Democratic Party.