Monday, 20 May, 2019

Warren unveils abortion rights platform following new laws

States with the worst anti-abortion laws also have the worst infant mortality rates Alabama governor signs bill, banning virtually all abortions, into law
Deanna Wagner | 18 May, 2019, 05:02

A new law should go further to prohibit states from "interfering in the ability of a patient to access medical care, including abortion services, from a provider that offers them". "That's what's both sad and lovely about this-that women are very resourceful and will do whatever it takes to make sure that safe and legal abortion can still be accessed".

Her post comes off the heels of abortion restrictions passed in Alabama and Georgia.

These laws, wrote Warren, would "preempt state efforts that functionally limit access to reproductive health care".

Missouri's Republican-led House is expected to pass a sweeping bill to ban abortions at eight weeks of pregnancy, on legislators' final day in session. Doctors would face five to 15 years in prison for violating the eight-week cutoff. Around 60 percent of Americans support a legal right to the procedure.

It is. For now.

In the aftermath of Brett Kavanaugh's confirmation to the Supreme Court, it was immediately assumed that pro-life groups and conservative states would try to ignite a new fight against Roe v. Wade. Lauren Arthur said, according to the member station. He concluded by asking whether one has "cause one to wonder which cases the court will overrule next".

If a court of appeals upholds a law such as Georgia's or Alabama's, then the Supreme Court will feel pressure to take the case, even if the justices who would like to overturn Roe do not want to do so just yet.

On the surface, this seems unlikely.

The senator from MA also urged passage of legislation that would stop states from passing constraints on abortion providers that are built to avoid violating the 1973 Roe decision, in which the Supreme Court recognised the constitutional right to an abortion. While men make up a majority of people putting these laws into practice, putting the blame exclusively on them also ignores people who are also complicit in limiting the reproductive rights of others.

Nepalese Sherpa climbs Mount Everest for record 23rd time
Everest, stood on top of the 8,850-metres peak together with other Sherpas on Wednesday morning, the Himalayan Times reported. Kami and seven other Nepali's reached the top of Mount Everest on Tuesday. "I am not risen to break records, I just worked".

US Senator and 2020 presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren has called for overhauling federal law to ensure women continue to have access to abortion amid efforts in states like Alabama and OH to enact bans.

As early as next week, the Court will decide whether to take cases from IN and Louisiana that put IN place greater abortion restrictions, including longer waiting times, increased burdens for clinics that provide abortion, and mandated ultrasound exams.

"An overwhelming majority of Missourians-Democrats, Independents, self-described pro-choice voters, women in greater numbers than men-agree that abortion on demand through birth, even when science informs us unborn children can feel excruciating pain, is extreme", she said in a statement.

For Chief Justice John Roberts, who has increasingly become the closest thing to a swing vote on the Court, doing away with Roe altogether would likely tarnish his legacy. If the right to abortion is at risk, that dynamic may change.

Politically, this compromise would play much better for Republicans because overturning Roe would create a political backlash that would nearly certainly boomerang against Republicans. For people without disposable funds to take a trip to a location that allows safe and legal abortion, it is a much more unsafe reality.

"Many of the girls who came through our program had the need to a safe, affordable abortion and could not get one".

"Alabama's vote is the latest in a string of abortion bans specifically created to strip people's reproductive rights away". She pointed to a bill filed in Congress, the Women's Health Protection Act, that would bar such laws.

Michael A. Cohen's column appears regularly in the Globe.