Friday, 20 September, 2019

Hong Kong protesters march to USA consulate calling for support

Joshua Wong Joshua Wong
Deanna Wagner | 11 September, 2019, 03:34

Protesters in Hong Kong are seeking permission for a large rally next Sunday and are also looking to get out a large crowd on October 1.

A bill, which would have allowed China to investigate and eventually force the extradition of "political dissidents" and other persons of interest living in Hong Kong, sparked the protests earlier in the summer, and millions of Hong Kong residents have taken to the streets to resist increasing Chinese control over the city-state's central government.

"They asked me why I wanted to post such a thing, and did I support independence for Hong Kong", Ou told RFA.

Protesters shout slogans and march with United States flags during a protest in Hong Kong, Sunday, Sept. 8, 2019.

Some believe the US and the West should show a little more spine in the dispute between the Hong Kong government, China, and the protesters.

It said in a statement Monday that "foreign legislatures should not interfere in any form in the internal affairs" of Hong Kong and that the city will safeguard its own autonomy.

"Covering our right eye with our right hand shows that we are sympathetic and supportive to the girl who lost her right eye in the protests", he said.

"I don't think the Chinese government was happy with Lam's withdrawal of the amendments because there have been sources in the past indicating that the [ruling] Chinese Communist Party had hoped she wouldn't cave in to pressure to respond positively to the five major demands of the people of Hong Kong".

Hong Kong police insignia
Hong Kong police insignia

Hong Kong is different to mainland China. The bill would allow sanctions on some political leaders in Hong Kong and China. Mr Trump has indicated the USA will stay out of the matter. They eye patch is a reference to a protester injured during demonstrations.

Hong Kong has been convulsed by months of unrest since its government announced attempts to make it easier to extradite suspects to China, a move seen as a prelude to bringing the pluralistic autonomous region more in line with the mainland.

On Saturday, Hong Kong police stopped the planned disruption at the airport with a security blitz that included checking passengers on trains and buses heading to the airport and limiting train services.

First introduced in US Congress in 2016 by Senators Marco Rubio and Tom Cotton, the Hong Kong Human Right and Democracy Act was amended in June to stipulate "open and direct democratic elections for all members of Hong Kong" by 2020.

After nearly three months, Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam agreed to scrap the bill, but she has rejected all other demands.

In a separate incident on Sunday, police lobbed a teargas grenade at a group of mostly reporters from inside a subway station without warning, scorching the press vest of an Australian photojournalist, Jared Stone, after it exploded. Protesters set fire to debris and were chased off by police officers using pepper spray. Donald Trump is elected by his people. The US State Department has warned its citizens in the territory that China has begun a propaganda campaign "falsely accusing" Americans of fomenting the unrest. She says Beijing recognizes the need for "different systems of values and ideas" to coexist, but in the end she suggests the "American dream" may not be a realistic objective in China.

Hong Kong democracy activist Joshua Wong has been released on bail, about 24 hours after he was arrested at the city's airport on his way to Germany for allegedly breaching his bail terms.

The protests, now in their 14th straight week, have continued despite Hong Kong's leadership finally meeting one of the protesters' key demands. In addition to getting daily notices from the university, there are also various protocols set up for students, said Julio Burgos, a junior economics major overseas in Hong Kong. Lam formally scrapped the bill last week as part of concessions aimed at ending the protests.

Juul warned over claims e-cigarette safer than smoking
The report also noted that company spokesman Ted Kwong said Juul was " reviewing the letters and will fully cooperate". However, vaping has reportedly been linked to at least five deaths and 450 illnesses across the nation.