Wednesday, 16 October, 2019

Brexit deal hopes hang on British breakfast with Barnier

BOURNEMOUTH ENGLAND- SEPTEMBER 14 European Parl UK, Ireland leaders agree Brexit deal 'possible'
Ginger Lawrence | 11 October, 2019, 19:57

Their talks "concentrated on the challenges of customs and consent", their joint statement said.

On Friday EU Brexit negotiator Michel Barnier said he had had a "constructive" meeting with his British counterpart, Stephen Barclay, following the Varadkar / Johnson meeting.

"The key thing is we have to have regard to the Good Friday Agreement and have regard to the need to have a cross-community approach to how we resolve this", he said.

The prime ministers of Britain and Ireland say they see "a pathway to a possible deal", less than three weeks before the United Kingdom is due to leave the European Union. The leaders of Britain and Ireland said they spotted a "pathway" to an elusive Brexit deal as hopes for a breakthrough dimmed before the U.K.'s October 31 deadline to leave the European Union.

Britain's Northern Ireland minister said that no single party in Northern Ireland would be given a veto in any Brexit deal, but that an agreement was now "a distinct possibility".

Tusk said "there is no guarantee of success and the time is practically up" but insisted both sides should use every opportunity available ahead of Britain's scheduled October 31 departure date.

But he added: "At the very end this is a British responsibility" on whether it leaves the European Union with or without a deal or even cancels the Brexit process outright.

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Speaking to reporters at the airport, Varadkar later said the meeting was "very positive", suggesting it would be a "short pathway, rather than a long one".

The main stumbling block remains how the U.K.'s only land border, between Britain and Ireland, is dealt with.

Earlier this week, several senior European Union figures played down the chances of Brexit happening with a deal agreed to by both sides.

In Paris, France's European affairs minister, Amelie de Montchalin, had another take on the debate, saying that a no-deal Brexit "is probable, at this stage".

"I have a fundamental question: why give more time".

As the hosts noticed similarities between the current deal and what the former Prime Minister had said before her deal was defeated twice, they asked Williamson what the differences were. If it is time for the sake of time?