Wednesday, 16 October, 2019

'Jesus shoes' filled with holy water sell out in one minute

The shoes are a take on Air Max 97s The shoes are a take on Air Max 97s
Deanna Wagner | 12 October, 2019, 10:46

MSCHF employees pitched different shoe concepts - sneakers with a holy nail and fake blood and a modern upgrade on the classic "Jandal" (Jesus sandal) trend. "As a Jew myself, the only thing I knew was that he walked on water", Greenberg added.

MSCHF took 24 pairs of Nike Air Max 97s and injected the soles with blessed water from the Jordan River, the same river where Jesus was believed to be baptized.

Nike shoes with actual holy water in the soles are going for as much as $3,000 a pop, and sold out in mere minutes when they dropped Tuesday morning.

In addition, the sneakers were adorned with a miniature crucifix intertwined with the laces, frankincense scented insoles and a single drop of blood on the tongue to symbolize Jesus.

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The quick-fire sale of the specially-made trainers is made all the more remarkable for the fact they cost a staggering $3,000 a pair. MSCHF has also inscribed Matthew 14:25 on the toe box and developed the entire design with a general biblical vibe. Now, we only have a passing knowledge of the bible from school RE lessons, but seem to remember something about Jesus getting angry once in a marketplace over profiteering?

Nike, which is in no way affiliated with "Jesus Shoes", did not immediately respond to PEOPLE's request for comment. "We weren't making a religious statement, but more saying, 'Hey, collab culture is getting out of hand, '" says Greenberg.

"We thought of that Arizona Iced Tea and Adidas collab, where they were selling shoes that (advertised) a beverage company that sells iced tea at bodegas", Fox News quoted Daniel Greenberg, head of commerce at MSCHF, as telling the New York Post.